Getting the Trinidadian crew to England this August is Caribbean Airlines, our national airline. We are ecstatic that the airline has decided to join the team.

It's a long journey for the boat, so accommodating her on her way to Cowes are the lovely people over at Darthaven Marina in Dartmouth, England.



What is Cowes Week?

Cowes Week regatta has been run since 1826. It is the largest sailing event in the UK and takes place in the first weeks of August. More than 8000 professional, Olympian and amateur sailors meet on the water to do battle in 40 classes over a grueling 8 days. Many foreign racing yachts return from the Caribbean ‘winter’ racing season to participate. Cowes is the longest running, as well as the largest regatta of its kind. 2015 will be the first time a T&T yacht will compete in Cowes.

Where does the name "Southman" come from?

The earliest recorded human settlement in the Caribbean is located at Banwari Trace, San Francique, Trinidad.   Carbon dating in 1971 dates the settlement and graves to BC 5200-3200. Read more here. These settlers came from the south – Guyana and Venezuela – and for over a millennium traversed  the eastern island chain of the Caribbean sometimes island hopping, sometimes going directly to far islands.

Operation Southman intends to continue this long established tradition of Caribbean seamanship.  In the spirit of Banwari Man, Legacy’s team will travel the Caribbean to Antigua, cross the Atlantic to the Azores and compete in UK Cowes Regatta before returning home.

​​​OPERATION  SOUTHMAN

Smashing a National Record

The Atlantic crossing record was set in 1960 by Trinidad and Tobago nationals Harold and Kwailan La Borde and their friend Kelvin “Buck” Wong Chong, aboard the locally built 26’ sailing yacht Hummingbird. The national record from Antigua to the Azores is 36 days. T&T national Richard Innis undertook a solo crossing west to east from Barbados to the Falmouth in a steel hull in 1991. He successfully completed the event in 48 days. Other national sailors have crossed the Atlantic returning from their circumnavigation via the east to west route. Others have crossed separately as crew, but none​ have completed the west to east crossing from Antigua to the Azores in a locally built vessel in recent years.  In May 2015, Reginald Williams and his team aboard Legacy sailed from Antigua following in Humming Bird’s path across the Atlantic, establishing a new national Atlantic crossing record of 16 days and 23 hours